Japanese Mahjong

Modern Japanese mahjong which is also known as riichi or reach mahjong is probably the most popular variation of mahjong played in Japan and is growing rapidly in the western hemisphere due to the raising popularity of Japanese pop culture. Japanese mahjong has a pattern-based system using yakus. Japanese mahjong is played with 136 tiles, and excludes the flowers and seasons (and jokers)

Riichi Yaku Overview

Yakuhai: A triplet of either your seat wind, the round wind or any
dragon. Open or closed. 1 han.
Tanyao: No terminals or honors. Open or closed. 1 han.
Pinfu: Only straights. Pair must be a non-value tile (not seat wind,
round wind or any dragons). Must go out on an open wait.
Closed only. 1 han. Example shows an open wait.
Iipeikou: Two identical straights in the same suit. Closed only. 1 han.
Chanta: All sets feature a terminal or honor. Open or closed. 2 han closed, 1 han open.
Itsuu: A 1-9 run in one suit. Open or closed. 2 han closed, 1 han open.
San shoku doujun: Same number sequence in all three suits. Open or closed. 2
han closed, 1 han open.
San shoku douko: Same number triplet in all three suits. Open or closed. 2
han.
San kan tsu: Three kans. Open or closed. 2 han.
Toi toi: All triplets. Open. 2 han.
San an kou: Three concealed triplets, rest of the hand can be open or
closed. 2 han.
Shou san gen: Two triplets and a pair of dragons. Open or closed. 2 han.
Honrouto: Only terminals and honors. Open or closed. 2 han.
Chiitoitsu: 7 pairs. Closed only. 2 han.
Honitsu: One suit + honors. Open or closed. 3 han closed, 2 han
open.
Jun chan: All sets feature a terminal, no honors. Open or closed. 3 han
closed, 2 han open.
Ryanpeikou: A hand with two separate Iipeikou. Closed only. 3 han.
Chinitsu: One suit only. Open or closed. 6 han closed, 5 han open

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